Cherries

Cherries are often more challenging than other tree fruits to grow, but the reward of picking them from the tree in your yard makes it worth the effort required to do it.

We only offer cherry trees on standard size rootstocks which will produce a 15-20 foot tree if you don’t keep them pruned to a manageable and net-able 10-12 ft. height. If you have a 20 ft. tall cherry tree loaded with fruit, you will feed most of it to the birds, since it’s nearly impossible to put netting on a tree that tall. Although cherry trees are available on dwarf rootstocks, they produce trees that are very high maintenance and I don’t believe the average person is looking for that much of a challenge.  Tart cherries are smaller growing trees, reaching around 12′ tall.

We do not offer the variety Bing. Even though the tree will grow in Michigan, the cherries crack with the slightest rainfall, and the fruit quickly rots. Most dark sweet cherries are sold as Bings.

The varieties of cherries offered are proven to perform well under Michigan growing conditions. They have good tolerance to rain induced cracking, and these varieties are also cold hardy.

Some of these varieties are self fertile which means you only need one tree to produce fruit, others require two different varieties for proper pollination or they will not set fruit. They are all listed as self fertile or pollinator required. Sweet cherries can only pollinate other sweet cherries. Tart cherries are self fertile and can not pollinate sweet varieties.         

Space sweet cherry trees 18 – 20 feet apart, and tart cherries 12 – 15 feet apart.

 

ALL CHERRY TREES ARE PRICED AT $24.50 ea.

 

SWEET CHERRIES


 Attika – this newer variety from the Czech Republic is doing very well in the great lakes region. Trees are cold hardy, strong growing, and disease resistant. The late ripening fruit is very large, dark maroon in color and has excellent, strong cherry flavor. Fruits are quite crack resistant also.  Ripens later in July and requires another variety nearby for pollination.  This is a great variety.   SOLD OUT

Requires a pollinator

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Black Pearl – is a new dark sweet variety developed by Cornell university. Fruit has excellent size, flavor, and firmness but still has very good crack resistance. Trees are strong growing with excellent disease resistance. Black Pearl has done very well in eastern and midwestern growing conditions. One of the best recent introductions in cherries.  Ripens in June.    SOLD OUT

Requires a pollinator

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Blushing Gold – is a beautiful, large yellow variety with a nice red blush. This newer cherry has very good resistance to disease and cracking along with great flavor and firmness. Blushing Gold requires pollination from another sweet cherry variety, and is a good pollinator for other yellow, and most dark cherries.  Ripens late June.    SOLD OUT

Requires a pollinator

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Emperor Francis – a great yellow variety with a beautiful red blush that is widely grown in Michigan for fresh eating and maraschino processing. Fruit is large, with excellent flavor and good crack resistance. Ripens in late June-July, and is commonly found at roadside stands in summer. This heirloom variety also has very good winter hardiness.  On rootstock that requires well drained soil.  Will not pollinate Ulster.        SOLD OUT

Requires a pollinator

 

Regina – is a newer variety that is being widely grown in the midwest and eastern states. Regina originated in Germany where the climate is much like ours, and has very good hardiness and disease resistance. The large black fruit is juicy, firm, exceptionally flavored, and more crack resistant than any cherry I’ve grown. Trees are strong growing and early to begin bearing. This very late ripening variety is also a good pollinator for other late cherries.  Ripens later in July.     Will not pollinate Van.    SOLD OUT

Requires a pollinator


Stella – a self fertile, dark red sweet cherry that is very popular in Michigan. Fruit is large and firm with moderate crack resistance and very good flavor. Stella is a great cherry for growing in your backyard, as only one tree is required to set fruit. Usually ripens in late June – early July.   This variety is a good pollinator for other sweet cherries.        SOLD OUT

Self fertile

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Ulster – is a great midwest variety that produces large, firm, delicious dark red fruit that has very good crack resistance. Trees are early to begin bearing and have good cold hardiness. Ulster is widely grown in Michigan, and many of the Traverse City cherries are these.  Ripens in late June – July.        SOLD OUT                       Will not pollinate Emperor Francis.

Requires a pollinator


Van – an earlier ripening medium-large dark sweet variety that is commercially grow for its fruit quality and high productivity. Good tolerance to cracking, and more cold hardy than most other sweet varieties. A good choice for colder areas of the state.  Also a good pollinator for most other cherries.  Ripens late June – early July    SOLD OUT            Will not pollinate Regina.   

Requires a pollinator

 

TART CHERRIES

 

Jubileum – a very early sweet tart cherry that produces dark mahogany fruit that will also sweeten up if left to hang on the tree. This one can be used for pies, wine, preserves, and if left untill fruit darkens, are exceptional for fresh eating. Trees are compact growing and reach about 10-12 feet in height. this is our earliest ripening tart variety, usually mid July.    SOLD OUT

Self fertile

 

Montmorency – This hardy variety is the standard of the tart cherry industry in Michigan and the rest of the country.  Fruit is bright red with yellow flesh and clear juice and is used for pies, drying, and making booze.  This variety is hardy in most of the lower peninsula.  Trees are early to begin bearing, and grow to about 15ft. tall.  Ripens late July – early August    This rootstock for well drained soil only.  SOLD OUT

                                                                                                                                  

                                Self fertile

Last Modified on March 30, 2021
this article Cherries